Maison

An Urban Cookery

 
 
 
 

{ News}

Transplanting

Field Notes. May 15th is the official “frost date” for Lancaster County. This is when all danger of frost has passed and farmers can plant warm season crops, such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplantss, outdoors. From mid-May until the end of June is our busiest time of the year between transplanting, direct-seeding more warm season…

June harvest.

Last year, in 2012, we harvested our first sugar snap peas for Ma(i)son on May 31st. This year we harvested the first crop on June 13th. This difference in time of almost two weeks reveals why growing food can be a challenge. The growth cycle is a natural process  subject to extremes of weather, pests…

New growth

Almost one month after I last wrote about the “signs of spring,” our vegetables, greens, grains, and fruits have grown by leaps and bounds, helped along by the warming soil temperature. Sugar snap, shelling, and snow peas are now flowering. So are the fava beans. The first pods will follow, soon. Our leafy greens are…

Salad from the field.

 Today I harvested an assortment of early spring greens and delivered them to Ma(i)son to become the foundation for Taylor’s “Insalata di Campo,” which is on the menu this weekend. “Insalata di Campo” roughly translates from Italian as “field salad,” or, literally, “salad of the field.” This “forager’s salad” is popular in rural regions of…

Patience…

Field notes. As the soil temperature in our fields continues to rise, more slow-germinating seeds are emerging. Today I noticed that the long rows of parsnips that I planted on April 10th have finally sprouted after almost one month of waiting! After 120 days of care, the long carrot-like roots will be ready for harvest….

Germination.

After weeks of waiting and watching I finally saw it, germination! 2013 has been an unusually cool spring in Lancaster County, which has delayed many farmers’ plantings and it has meant that seeds have been slow to sprout and grow. But this week our salsify and scorzonera, some of the slowest germinating seeds that I…

Signs of Spring

Field notes.  Spring has arrived in Lancaster County. Our fields have taken on a lush green hue, seeds that we planted at the beginning of the month are germinating, and the fruit trees are in full bloom. This is an exciting time of year.  Here are a few snapshots of what’s happening in the fields…

A Farmer’s Introduction, Part Two.

Introducing the Wenger Farm. Touching history and tasting tradition are experiences that a visitor has when they set foot on my family’s Lancaster County farmland. We specialize in biodiversity: growing and exploring food plants and heritage breeds of animals that are seldom seen in Lancaster County, and many that are rarely raised outside of their…

A Farmer’s Introduction…

  For those of you familiar with this blog or our restaurant, our incredible culinary garden and farmer Alex are not a new topic to you.  We have been working with Alex for nearly two years now further developing our garden to supply the restaurant in incredible ways.   (Photo Courtesy of Lancaster Newspaper) Alex…

An Intimate, Farm-Driven, Urban Cookery